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20121101
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have joined us. coming up, right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: sara lawrence-lightfoot is a renowned harvard professor and author. her latest book is called "exit: the endings that set us free." good to have the on this program. >> it is great to be here. thank you, tavis. tavis: tell me more about your fascination with endings. >> i have noticed for a very long time, from when i was very young, how we did about x's, departures, bias, in our schools, our neighborhoods, that we are so preoccupied with beginnings, with launchings, was tilting toward the future and seizing opportunities that we neglect the important moments of reflection that can go on when we are saying goodbye
book is called forget about today. we are glad you joined us for a look health care and the influence of bob dylan coming up now. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> the california endowment happens in neighborhoods. learn now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: dr. eric topol has shared the department of the cleveland clinic. he has directed the transitional science institute's and is the ok.hor of the new boat it is great to have you on the program. >> thank you. >> how will the digital revolution creates a better health care? >> you are used to digitize books and music. how about people? we can get through sequencing once genome. basically everything fed makes you take -- that makes you tick we can change medicine. tavis: give me examples. >> l
everyone is talking about this week, david petraeus. we are glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: tomorrow night on this program, we'll bring you our conversation with frank rich. he takes a critical look of what went wrong for the gop and the prospects of moving forward. that should be a good conversation tomorrow night. tonight, we wanted to start this week with the story that is shaking up washington. the sudden resignation of cia director david petraeus. thomas ricks is a pulitzer prize-winning journalist and a best-selling author. he is a fellow at the center for a new american security. good to have you back on this program. let's get the petraeus stuff at of th
. the scam which brought down the c.i.a. director spread further. now it is the actions of the top u.s. commander in afghanistan called into question. failing its mandate, the bbc gains access into an internal report showing the united nations failed to protect civilians in sri lanka. >> they left actually at the moment the population needed them more than ever. the government wanted them out of the way essentially because they didn't want anyone to see what was happening. >> running the world in just a week. a marathon man on a mission that boo leave most of us in the dust. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. bizarre. it is the only way to describe the scandal that has already claimed the job of the c.i.a. director and now has america's top commander in afghanistan under investigation. both are strange enough, but how do you explain the addition of a shirtless f.b.i. agent and 30,000 e-mails. here is the latest. >> it is a washington drama with a stellar cast. the spy chief, the top general and two women who soon found themselves at the heart o
nature it is a very bumpy process. >> indeed, we will. thank you for joining us. turning to syria, where two car bombs ripped through damascus suburb today. it is known for being loyal to president assad. the more than 30 were killed. over 80 were injured. the attack comes as fighting inside the country intensifies, making the refugee situation even worse. according to the united nations, more than 100,000 have fled into lebanon. and thousands more are on the waiting list. the war has put huge strains on neighboring countries, leading many struggling. -- leaving many families struggling. and >> the northern border of lebanon with syria, this is where thousands of refugees have escaped in august to years to escape serious moral and war -- syria's pergo civil war. -- berchtold civil war. this family had fled here because it's other boy, 3-year- old mohammed, had been abducted by pro-government militia and was presumed dead. now he has had to move on. the baby is older and stronger, but the family was forced to leave the school because of tensions because -- between local lebanese and the r
years after a massive oil spill at daily inched the u.s. coast. --deluged the u.s. coast. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. there are real concerns that the conflict between palestinian militants in gaza and israel could spark a wider conflict in the region. air raid fire sounded in the israeli city of tel aviv as rockets were fired towards it. the assaults underlines the rising tension. >> tonight, sirens sounding across tel aviv. the commercial capital and most populous city now a target for the rockets being fired by militants -- militants in gaza. people to cover bread they could. there were no casualties -- people took cover where they could. there were no casualties. >> i saw a flash of light. 2 kilometers in the direction of the seat. the rocket landed in the seat. >> targeting tel aviv marks a significant escalation of this growing conflict. the body of the man held responsible by his it -- by israel for launching hundreds of rockets from gauze that. -- gaza. at his funeral in gaza city, the military commander was carried to the streets
to go before the u.s. presidential election, a new jobs report is fueling arguments on the campaign trail. it seems to have something for everyone. president obama is time-outing that more jobs were -- touting that more jobs have been created than were expected. romney says the overall elm ploit rate is actually up. now startshe weekend blitz and the bbc's adam brooks has been watching the reaction for us. >> the voter in the state of ohio -- >> in 2008 we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. today our businesses have created nearly 5 1/2 million new jobs and this morning we learned the companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. >> new jobs were created in america in october. 171,000 of them, many in health care, retail and business services. many more people returned to the workforce, possibly a sign of economic optimism. but still these are not numbers to excite a tired and skittish electorate. mitt romney, campaigning in wisconsin, trying to erode mr. obama's support in the midwest. he too
states to visit. president obama uses the final hours to campaign for every vote he can. >> after all we've been through together, we can't give up now. because we've got more change to do. >> his rival, mitt romney, traveled to four states to make his final pitch for a change in the white house. >> you hoped that president obama would live up to his promise to bring people together and to solve problem. he hasn't. i will. >> and if you live here, the election is secondary. a week after sandy blew through in new york neighborhood, it's still waiting for help. welcome to our viewers on public television in america. and also around the globe. for those of you despairing that this presidential election has gone on far too long, good news. it's almost over. the final day of campaigning saw the candidates flying across the country in a last bid for votes. tonight we have comprehensive coverage of how the campaign looks at the very end. the bbc north american editor has been with the obama campaign in wisconsin. he starts our coverage. >> win or lose, it's the last time he'll campaign to save
the cliff, it can be very bad for markets. >> what about the u.s. economy? dodge the congressional budgetary office says that if we go over in its entirety, $600 billion worth of tax increases and spending cuts, there is no doubt we will go into recession. if it is half a year or the entire year, it will depend on the rest of the world. europe is still in trouble, and emerging markets are slowing and that makes it all the more important washington get their act together. >> can the president pull anything out of the hat? >> he needs to pull something surprising. one of the things in the run-up to the election that was a case to be made for governor romney, investors thought he might be able to shop congress, surprised the situation back into alignment. the president has to bring both sides together and have talked going to an off site meeting somewhere and having a more bipartisan cabinet collected in order to bring unity. but he has to do something surprising. >> this is a self-inflicted wound, isn't it? >> absolutely. the compromises that we made to raise the debt ceiling over a year ago,
recognition that the palestinians were seeking. israel and the u.s. were opposed. it could delay hopes for achieving an independent palestinian state through peace talks. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton said the vote was unfortunate and counterproductive. >> a landmark day in and often turbulent history. jubilant palestinians to i heard there president demand what he said was their basic right to self-determination. >> the moment has arrived for the world to see clearly. enough with the settlements and occupation we are here now. >> after days of diplomacy, the majority backed palestine's bid to be recognized as a nation, but without full membership. many in a yasser arafat a square felt this was a symbolic than significant day, were the of celebration. a little -- the political activists are happy, but know that the struggle continues. >> we learned not to get our hopes up, not to get high expectations. we will wait. but we feel that we are heading in the right direction. >> israeli control over the occupied territories will not end as a result of the u.n. vote. the palestinia
to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: part two of our conversation with oliver stone and peter kusnick. their 10-part series on showtime kicks off next monday night. now is another preview of "the. history of the united states. " -- "the untold story of the united states. " >> i steadied american history. it made sense. we were the center of the world. there was manifest destiny and we were the good guys. i have traveled the world now. i continue my education as an infantryman in vietnam. made a lot of movies, some of them about history. and i have learned a lot more about what i once knew. and when i heard from my children what they're learning in school, i was perturbed that they were not getting the more honest view of the world and i did. we lived most of our lives in a fog. but i will let my children to have access to something that looks beyond what i recall as the tyranny of now. >> material now. tavis: the you think a 10-part series on showtime, a companion book
obama becomes the first u.s. president [indiscernible] pressing for reforms. >> you will not believe the scientific advance that has this dog back on his feet. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. the u.n. secretary-general is among those calling for an immediate end to the violence in gaza. his words come as more than 100 have been killed in the past week of fighting. the majority of them palestinians. palestinian militants have continued firing weapons into israel. in cairo, discussions are ongoing about cease-fire. jeremy our coverage from gaza. >> good morning, gaza. this was the wake-up call sent in by israel. growing up in gaza is not easy. not far away, is the rubble left by the israeli strike on sunday that killed 10 members of this family including four children and two neighbors. they are looking for the remains of a teenage girl missing and presumed dead. this man is a relative of the dead. >> sad, may be strong. >> street are getting tougher, more solid. when they tell the parents of a boy, he will grow up for revenge. >> during the
for south africa. >> tired of turkey after thanksgiving? how about some sushi. anthony more dane talk to us about the food that inspired his new graphic novel. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. across egypt today there have been violent protests following the president's decision to grant himself sweeping new powers. buildings belonging to the muslim brotherhood party have been ransacked, with some set on fire. the president says he has taken on the powers to help steer the country through the difficult transition to democracy, but critics claim he is trying to make himself a new pharaoh. >> fury in egypt as president morsi gives himself a big, new powers. there were protests across the country. in cairo, the crowds flooded back to tahrir square, where last year they celebrated the ousting of hosni mubarak. now they say the new president has become even more of the dictator with an edict saying the courts cannot challenge him. >> he is taking more power than mubarak. >> it was only days ago that the president was basking in the world and american a
. on the edge of the square, the clashes began release today. protesters in threw sticks at the u.s. embassy. the police responded with tear gas. hear, the casualty toll is widening. these protesters are furious with the president. many fear he wants to turn the country in to listen now -- into an islamic state. some of them are kids looking for a fight. politicians linked arms. among them, a nobel prizewinner who has called the president and new faro. it turned into one of the biggest demonstrations since the revolution last year. >> the egyptians are not any more afraid of the authority, of the power. they have the courage to declare their desires and their demands and to work and to sacrifice to achieve their demands. >> and barely a year after the last revolution, egyptians are demanding the president should go. and there is no sign when or where this confrontation will end. >> for more on the unrest, i spoke a short time ago with the director and president of the woodrow wilson international center for scholars. she has returned from cairo. you have been there three times, while we're s
and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >> reporter: mr. obama departed his hometown of chicago this afternoon for washington, his home for another four years. waiting for him: a still- divided congress now facing a critical lame duck session.
be the way to do it. one of us suggested maybe he'd like to have a last smoke. so i got him his tobacco and his pipe, and he enjoyed that. and then he indicated that it was time. he took the gun-- he had loaded it-- and with the aid of his walker, we walked out to the garden. he chose the spot, and he decided he would lie down. so we said goodbye. and i shook his hand. i walked up the road a few hundred feet. i started to say, "god bless you," and i got "god bless" out when i heard the shot. he had put the revolver in his mouth, and it was instantly effective. and his pulse ceased soon after that. and i felt very sure that i could report that he was dead. >> narrator: john welles, a long-time friend of hunt williams, had been diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer a few months earlier. 66 years old and fiercely independent, john had always told friends that he would take his own life if he ever became incapacitated. >> to a man like john, this bear of a man who was reduced to an invalid, life didn't offer him anything after that. there are times, and certainly this was one of them, whe
affected. >> to us, it's just how we live. you don't get to make choices in how you live. >> one in 13 americans is now unemployed, and many children are growing up with little hope for their future. >> i'm surprised by how things can change so fast. you can go from doing okay to going hungry and on the verge of being homeless again. >> and we're going to start with numbers one through 20. >> food banks struggle to keep up with demand, and homeless shelters have long waiting lists, as even middle-income families sometimes lose their homes with just a few days' notice. >> if the tv can fit in your school bag, you can take it. if it didn't fit, you couldn't take it. >> we asked these children wht a life being poor in america really looks like, through their eyes. >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontliis provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is ava
is in virginia. with the election just five days away, cautiously, politicians are moving on. >> he used to make the space where he would scrunch up his face -- >> but others never will. she lost her son to the storm. jacob was 23. he and a friend were crushed by falling tree. >> he kept calling me every 20 minutes, and finally, -- i kept calling him every 20 minutes, and finally, a man answered his phone, and i asked who he was. he said he was detective simon, and i asked where my son was, and he asked my address, said he wanted to come to my apartment. >> the lights are out. the power gone. in manhattan alone, 750,000 people are without electricity. every day that passes, businesses are losing money. >> i have never seen anything like it. look at this. what a mess. >> do you have power? >> do i have power? no, i am in the dark. >> there is one ray of light, and it is underground. the new york subway began offering restricted service this morning, allowing some commuters to take their usual journey, but it will be many months before the familiar everyday parts of the city returned. >> for more
to get us support at the polls. -- to get the best support at the polls. >> this is america, a democracy. this is what it is all about. >> will he stay in power for another four years or be rejected after one term? the president is checking to make sure there is no backsliding from supporters. >> we feel confident that we will win, but it will determine on voter turnout. -- be determined by voter turnout. i would encourage everyone to participate in this process that people have fought so hard for us to have. >> more than 90 million americans are expected to vote today. all eyes are on the ohio, one of just eight states that could go either way and will decide the election. >> i am not thrilled with either choice, but i will stick with barack. >> we are really sick with what has been going on with the fans in the last four years. >> after america elected its first black president cannot many were filled with hope. >> -- its first black president, many were filled with hope. >> they are trying to rebuild the giant coalition using colder, more technical tactics. they call it the ground gam
the election. china gets ready to take a new generation. the u.s. voters have spoken, and after a hard-fought campaign, they have reelected barack obama. right now the president and his family have returned to the white house, where they will be residents for the next four years. right now it is about watching the votes come in. mr. obama has won 303 alike toro college of votes. mr. romney had 260. for the popular vote, president obama had 50.1%. nit romney hadn't 48.3%. -- mitt romney had 48.3%. we go to chicago for the obama victory. >> this is what the three looks like, a moment of it -- what victory looks like, a moment of triumph. it is not near happiness. it is a dream and the man who embodies it. barack obama savored the moment. he became the first black american to win a second term. he basked in the pride of his wife and daughters. he said alexian's can be small and silly but this was big and important. vice whether i have earned your vote or not, i have listened to you. i have learned from you, and you have made me a better president. with your stories and your struggles, i r
hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome keira knightley to this program. this friday you can catcher in the film adaptation of the classic "anna karenina." hear a sampling of her other work. >> had not your pride heard by my honesty and your scruples. do expect to rejoice in the inferiority of your circumstances? >> and those are the words of a gentleman? your arrogance and his seat, your disdain for the feelings of others made me realize i was -- you were the last man in the world i could be prevailed upon to marry. >> do you know what i am talking about? you knew before i did. >> where are you crying? >> don't you know? >> freedom and moderation. >> precisely. >> surely you are full the best intentions. i would not spend my vote on so vague a statement. one is either free or what is not. the freedom concept is an absolute. one cannot be moderately dad or moderately loved or moderately free
of early r&b vocal groups that began to cross over into the culture of the big cities and helped us identify ourselves in the process. [applause] and now... thank you. and now the capitol recording stars, the singing five keys! ♪ ♪ i sa mok em boo di ay ♪ i sa mok em boo ♪ i went to china town ♪ way back in old hong kong ♪ took out some egg foo yung ♪ and then i heard a gong ♪ ling, ting, tong, tried to sing that song called ♪ ♪ i sa mok em boo di ay, i sa mok em boo ♪ we were the first rock-and-roll generation. before us, the kids had to listen to what their parents listened to, the big band. nothing wrong with the big band, but it's the first time the kid had his own music. ♪ and as i looked around ♪ the lights were going down ♪ and this is what i found ♪ a ling, ting, tong, tried to sing that song ♪ ♪ called i so mok em boo di ay, i so mok em boo ♪ bobby jay: there was a new market coming along that no one yet identified or targeted, the teenager. they were always there. in the '40s with sinatra they were called bobbysoxers. they didn't want to
that stand between us in some of the best years we've known is lack of leadership. and that's why we have elections after off. this tuesday is the moment to look into the future and imagine what we can do, to put the past four years behind us and start building a new future. >> and barack obama looking presidential yesterday in a bomber jacket in air force one saying romney is not worth the risk. >> after four years as president, you know me by now. you may not agree with every decision i've made. you may be frustrated at the pace of change, but you know what i believe. you know where i stand. you know i'm willing to make tough decisions even when they're not politically convenient. >> let's start by assessing these closing arguments. john, "you know me by know" can work both ways? >> it can work both ways but for this president that's not a bad closing argument. he also got a decent bit of economic news with the jobs report, came in about 46,000 over what the consensus forecast had been. and so he's casting this as we're slowly going in the right direction. we're on the right track. we'v
we know some of you are, you can also follow us tonight on our multichannel live stream. there can find up-to-the-minute results on our interactive map center. you can find a live election blog. you can find speeches from the winners and losers that will be coming along later tonight, and a whole lot more. >> ifill: here with us in our election night studio, which is very spiffy, if i say so myself, as they will be all evening long-- they're spiffy, too, and how long-- >> woodruff: especially when you see the overhead shot. >> ifill: mark shield, and david brooks, and michael beschloss, and richard norton smith, and we're going to talk among ourselves for just a moment what we see coming. what are you watching for, david? >> florida and virginia right now. you want-- >> ifill: do you have a white board? >> i wish i did. i'm not that spiffy. we talked a lot about ohio. but to get to ohio mitt romney has to hurdle florida and virginia. and we've really got no real information but little whiffes of information, looking pretty competitive in both places. so the romney people should be
committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: for more tonight on the election of 2012 and what it means beyond the results, i am pleased to be joined by amy goodman. she is the host of "democracy now!" and her new book is called "the silent majority." she joins us from new york. good to have you back on this program. >> it is great to be with you, tavis. tavis: there so as to talk about. your thoughts on what happened this week, giuliani presidential race and whether you were surprised by any of the results. >> i definitely thought that president obama would win. when you look at what mitt romney said along the way, when you looked at his actions, when you look at the 47%, i wondered if he would win, if his number would be 47%, talking about the people who would not vote for him. but president obama, now in his second term, i think presents us an extremely interesting challenge to many of the people who voted for him. i mean, you now have the c
. in the past, military strikes have been used to send messages about the toughness of israeli leaders. >> we will take whatever action is necessary to put a stop to this. this is not merely our right. it is also our duty. >> hamas has sworn to hit back. they said the same thing during the last gossan warner -- gazan war. this showed limitations against israel's army. before the assassination, the egyptian government had been working to establish a cease- fire, and efforts have been praised by top security officials. egypt's president is a leader of the muslim brotherhood. the assassination will be seen as a calculated and dangerous insult. egypt strongly condemns what israel is doing in gaza. this is an unacceptable act, and we deeply condemn it. >> what has changed since the war? the west and israel have lost their most reliable friend, and egypt's president mubarak. they saw him as an indispensable part of the solution at times like this. >> heightened tensions in the middle east tonight. in other news from around the world, the united nations secretary general ban ki moon has set a report
have joined us. coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome the maria to this program. in addition to your column and the syndicated series, she is the host of a show on cnbc and joins us tonight from new york city. the dow have you back on the program. >> good to be with you. >> i mentioned all this drama, what happened at the closing bell the day? >> we saw a pretty good rally, there was rhetoric over the weekend that the two sides, republicans and democrats along with the president have the will to come together on these very important issues surrounding the fiscal cliff. has been a rocky situation as investors anticipate any outgoing talks fr
of diplomacy involving the u.n. secretary general and the secretary general -- and the u.s. secretary of state. from gaza, jeremy bowen reports. a warning, you might find some of these images distressing. >> because i came back to life after the cease-fire began. -- gaza came back to life after the cease-fire began. coming to another israeli bombing campaign felt like another victory. this was the hamas interior ministry. governing with or without a cease-fire will be harder with the main administrative center ron. in jerusalem tonight, is real hint that more military action if the new cease-fire does not hold. >> i know there are citizens expecting a more severe military action, and perhaps we will need to do so but at this time, the right thing for the state of israel is to use this opportunity to achieve a lasting cease-fire. >> an attack on a bus in tel aviv was praised by hamas, but not claimed by them. both sides wanted this deal. all this, and rockets hit in the city from gaza and has dented a sense of security. a ceasefire will not necessarily bring israel could not have kept them from
in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nevada with the early vote which tells us a little bit how this thing is starting to break. >> we close this evening with this question what is the impact of the digital revolution on books, writers and publishing. joining me ken auletta, tim o reilly, jonathan safran foer an jane frieman. >> i like the idea of ebooks how they can democratize books. ma what i am afraid of is on platforms that have distracks an are inherently fast makes it harder to make books books. >> it is so important to have historical perspective. you know what we consider the book today is a relatively recent historical phenomenon. i totally disagree that homer would recognize the book. you know actually we probably more recognize the ebook. >> rose: hurricane sandy, politics and publishing when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this has been a difficult week for the city of new york four days after hurricane sandy made landfa
that this moment in our history has to teach us. marion cotillard, andrew solomon, and a look at incarceration when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. rose: marion cotillard is here. she came to fame with her oscar-winning performance in 2007's film le vie rose." she was in this summer's batman movie. sewing magazine called her a french siren with hollywood appeal. in her new movie, she plays a trainer who survives a devastating desperate. here's the trailer for the film. ♪ ♪ >> rose: i am pleased to have marion cotillard at this table for the very first time. welcome. >> thank you. >> rose: and congratulations. >> thank you very much. thank you for having me. >> rose: tell me about this. there was a director you wanted to work with. >> yes. >> rose: interesting story. some challenge from playing an amputee. but what was overwhelming for you? was it the theme? was it what? >> well, nothing was overwhelming. you know, when-- and i never see my job as a challenge. sometimes you have to work on things that are kind of
a program about alleged child use by a former bbc star was dropped. the director general resigned following another report accusing another politician's sex abuse. >> is this the man to save the bbc? the broadcaster's crisis has claimed some senior staff. tim davies is charged with studying the ship. it was the flagship news program, "newsnight" that made two mistakes, wrongly accusing politicians. that led to the resignation of the director general. the new acting boss is trying to reestablish public faith. >> it has been a very difficult episode and the bbc it is all about trust. bbc needs to be trusted. if we have not got that we have not done anything. what i have done over the last day at has been a busy day, have focused on creating a simple change of command in the news and worked on how i can get assurances as the man in charge in the output we have to be trustworthy. >> that means a reshuffle. two senior executives, and her deputy have been asked to step aside for the time being. already there is a new headache. questions in parliament. his $700,000 severance package has been criti
to stand up to the people who were in power under president mubarak? >> but that will not give us the kind of freedom that we want. you cannot be a dictator to gain freedom from dictatorship. what you can do is to say, trust me to do x, y, and that. he can't bring in these forces and -- he can bring in these forces and say, i need you to be my checks and balances. we do not have a separation of powers. the only checks and balances we have right now is the street. we have a triangle, which is the military. these people on the support have -- on the street have been pushed aside. the revolution will keep him honest. >> there will be demonstrations in the streets tomorrow. we will be following that as well. joining me. or now to syria where the rebel- held area of the baskets claims that he -- of damascus claims that government forces bombed a playground full of children. the shell landed near a refugee camp where nearly 12,000 are living in awful conditions. >> atma camp, for 12,000 people this is as far away from the war they can get. it is wet and cold, even before the winter has really s
could find, which would have made life a lot easier for all of us. right. but what i saw initially, stylization. not only the colors that were used, but the way the colors are applied to this piece. let's show it in the round. the design is very unusual, and to my eye peculiar to shearwater pottery from ocean springs, mississippi, which started in 1928, and which was destroyed when katrina went through there a few years back. they're rebuilding it, but it's a very famous pottery, primarily run by walter and mac anderson, who did most of the decorating through the '30s and '40s and '50s. walter is recognized as an artistic genius. couldn't really socialize. he was left to himself to decorate and design. but this is what he did. the colors, the patterns. what also i notice, where the clay shows through, and then the clay color inside, looks to me like shearwater pottery. so i'm pretty sure that's what it is. and it's what we have to do when we don't have a mark. i did research. there's not an exact picture of this in any of the books that i found. and so we have to make certain educa
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